Fake IRS Letters – What You Need To Know 

You may have gotten a Robo or Live telephone call warning you that the IRS has issued a warrant for your arrest.  Most people are not falling for that scam anymore.  They know that the IRS will not call you until they have sent you exhaustive correspondence.

The latest fraud is to send you a letter claiming to be the IRS.  Here is a link to the IRS scam warning page,  IRS Scam link.

Sometimes the crooks include personal information in the letter that make them seem legitimate. They can get this information from some public sources like tax liens.  Don’t be fooled into sending money or personal information.

Here are some hints to help you avoid being a victim.

  1. Never send checks to the IRS, if the notice asks you to pay anyone besides the US Treasury then the notice is a fraud.
  2. A legitimate notice will arrive in a government envelope postage paid with the bulk IRS permit.
  3. Typically, IRS notices include a notice or letter number in the upper right hand corner. If you do not see one you most likely have a fake notice.
  4. IRS correspondence usually includes a part of your Social Security number. If it does not be very suspicious.
  5. IRS notices also include an 800 number near the top of the page. If it looks odd, you can always call the main number 1.800.829.1040.
  6. The IRS includes a listing of your rights and/or an explanation on how to appeal or arrange payment options.
  7. If the letter asks you to send a gift card or credit/debit card information it is a scam.
  8. The real IRS will not threaten to arrest or deport you.

Finally, your best bet is to share all IRS communications with your CPA. When you give them a Power of Attorney they can check your status and correct any errors the IRS may have.

Scott Mitchem, CPA, CVA, CFE

Director of Valuation and Litigation Services

scottmitchem@pkcpa.com

(602) 776-6313